Basics

Glufosinate-ammonium is one of the most widely-applied broad-spectrum herbicides, controlling weeds in a huge variety of crops worldwide. Its unique mode of action makes it ideal to be used in rotation with other herbicides to mitigate weed resistance.

What is Glufosinate-ammonium?

What is Glufosinate-ammonium?

GA is a herbicide ensuring a high degree of crop safety by affecting only the part of a plant where it is applied. » more

How does Glufosinate-ammonium work

How does Glufosinate-ammonium work?

GA is a crop protection product that works by inhibiting an enzyme central to plant metabolism. » more

Where is Glufosinate-ammonium used?

Where is Glufosinate-ammonium used?

GA is currently registered for use on more than 100 crops in around 80 countries. » more

The sun rises on crop diversity Basics

Maize (corn) monocultures are a common sight on Hungary’s Northern Great Plain. But as with any monoculture herbicide resistance is always a potential danger. In 2010 Istvan Szolomajer discovered Panicum riparium growing on his fields. Initially, Istvan and his fellow farmers used ALS inhibitors to control this weed, but after several years of application, there was strong evidence of an emerging resistance problem. Istvan’s solution to the resistance problem was to replace maize monoculture with crop diversity – changing from monocot to dicot crops and from spring to winter crops, for example. This year, he has been growing sunflowers on 100 ha, winter wheat on 50 ha, and maize on most of the remaining 200 ha under cultivation. This crop diversity has brought Istvan welcome relief from resistant Panicum riparium. Close cooperation with Bayer staff in Hungary has been a crucial factor in Istvan’s diversity strategy.

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About GA in 3 minutes

What alternatives to using Glufosinate-ammonium does the farmer have?

Alternative chemical treatments often affect whole plants rather than just the part of the plant with which they come into contact, which would harm the crop. Alternative chemical treatments also tend to have a smaller spectrum of control.

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