Benefits for the crop

As a broad-spectrum herbicide highly effective against a variety of weeds, Glufosinate-ammonium has enabled the healthy production of more than 100 crops, including fruits and nuts, canola, soybean and cotton. This has fostered the availability of more high quality and affordable food as well as various products. Farmers also rely on GA when treating young trees as it is a contact herbicide and so can control weeds surrounding trees without harming the tree itself.

Additionally, crops such as canola, corn, cotton and soybeans with the LibertyLink trait are tolerant to Glufosinate-ammonium. Growers are therefore able to apply this herbicide in-crop for non-selective post-emergence weed control, right up to ten weeks prior to harvest, before these weeds jeopardize yield potential.

Did you know?

  • There are 8,000 species of weeds worldwide that not only compete with the crop for water, light, nutrients and space, but also reduce crop quality by contaminating the harvest.1
  • Global damage caused by weeds is responsible for a loss of 13.2% of agriculture production.2 It is estimated that weeds destroy the food of about 1 billion people.3
1 | Oerke, E.C., H.W. Dehne, F. Schnbeck, and A. Weber, Crop Production and Crop Protection: Estimated Losses in Major Food and Cash Crops, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1994.
2 | PennState Extension. Introduction to Weeds: What are weeds and why do we care? http://extension.psu.edu/pests/ipm/schools/educators/curriculum/weeds/introweeds
3 | Berca, M. Perspectives Regarding Weeds Control, University Foundation CERA for Agriculture and Rural Development, 2004.
The sun rises on crop diversity

Maize (corn) monocultures are a common sight on Hungary’s Northern Great Plain. But as with any monoculture herbicide resistance is always a potential danger. In 2010 Istvan Szolomajer discovered Panicum riparium growing on his fields. Initially, Istvan and his fellow farmers used ALS inhibitors to control this weed, but after several years of application, there was strong evidence of an emerging resistance problem. Istvan’s solution to the resistance problem was to replace maize monoculture with crop diversity – changing from monocot to dicot crops and from spring to winter crops, for example. This year, he has been growing sunflowers on 100 ha, winter wheat on 50 ha, and maize on most of the remaining 200 ha under cultivation. This crop diversity has brought Istvan welcome relief from resistant Panicum riparium. Close cooperation with Bayer staff in Hungary has been a crucial factor in Istvan’s diversity strategy.

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Learn about LibertyLink Crops

Is Glufosinate-ammonium present in our food?

Any traces of Glufosinate-ammonium that may remain on crops and that are ingested directly by humans or indirectly as a result of consuming meat and milk from animals that have fed on such crops are limited at stricter levels than defined toxicological safety thresholds.

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