Benefits for the crop

As a broad-spectrum herbicide highly effective against a variety of weeds, Glufosinate-ammonium has enabled the healthy production of more than 100 crops, including fruits and nuts, canola, soybean and cotton. This has fostered the availability of more high quality and affordable food as well as various products. Farmers also rely on GA when treating young trees as it is a contact herbicide and so can control weeds surrounding trees without harming the tree itself.

Additionally, crops such as canola, corn, cotton and soybeans with the LibertyLink trait are tolerant to Glufosinate-ammonium. Growers are therefore able to apply this herbicide in-crop for non-selective post-emergence weed control, right up to ten weeks prior to harvest, before these weeds jeopardize yield potential.

Canola seed (oilseed rape) is crushed for food and non-food uses such as edible oil, renewable biofuels and lubricants. The residue is sold as canola meal, providing high energy animal feed. Canola is a major crop for Canada, Australia, China, India and Europe. It is also increasingly cultivated throughout areas in the USA. Canola plays a vital role in crop rotation as a break crop and is grown in fields to interrupt the repeated sowing of cereals. Losing canola could substantially impact the production of other crops and cereals.

Weeds are highly competitive with canola, and can use up resources – moisture, nutrients, access to sunlight – that would otherwise be available to the crop. Weeds like cleaver, similar to canola in size and shape, can contaminate the harvest by being mistakenly picked. Therefore, good weed control early in the growth season requires an integrated and consistent management strategy for canola. The use of high-yielding canola varieties – bred using genetic modification to be herbicide-tolerant (HT) – and in conjunction with broad spectrum herbicides offer the most powerful means of weed control.

The only broad spectrum herbicides that can be used with HT canola crops today are Glufosinate-ammonium and Glyphosate. Until recently, only Glyphosate-tolerant canola was available. Insufficient rotation of the herbicidal modes of action in the past has resulted in many weeds in vital canola growing regions no longer responding to Glyphosate treatment. As such, farmers are increasingly aware of the need to rotate their use of Glyphosate with Glufosinate-ammonium to mitigate weed resistance.

Canola field
Canola field

Did you know?

  • With more than 11 million tonnes of canola produced, China ranks among the biggest world producers, followed by Canada, India, and Germany.
Canola (“Can” for Canada and “ola” for oil low acid) has very low level of saturated fat – 7% or below. It was developed by Canadian plant breeders by removing the anti-nutritional components from rapeseed.1
1 | Soya Tech. Canola Facts. http://www.soyatech.com/canola_facts.htm
Step by Step with Farmers

Agriculture is up against enormous challenges: how to feed a growing world population, the pressure of climate change, and limited natural resources. Innovations in agricultural research and development translate into specific solutions to protect crops from pests, diseases, and weeds. In Latin America, there is more pest incidence and aggressiveness than in other latitudes, which increases the likelihood of pests becoming more resistant. CuidAgro, integrated by government and members of the agribusiness through associations in 18 countries in Latin America, is bringing farmers training courses to help improve their productivity, agricultural practices, and ultimately ensure a more sustainable agriculture. Properly using technologies is a responsibility shared by farmers, distributors, manufacturers, and authorities.

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Learn about LibertyLink Crops

Is Glufosinate-ammonium present in our food?

Any traces of Glufosinate-ammonium that may remain on crops and that are ingested directly by humans or indirectly as a result of consuming meat and milk from animals that have fed on such crops are limited at stricter levels than defined toxicological safety thresholds.

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