Benefits in the field

Glufosinate-ammonium’s distinguishing chemistry enables a substantial increase in yields and offers significant agricultural advantages. Compared to alternative herbicides, Glufosinate-ammonium controls weeds without affecting the root system of the protected crops. Its broad spectrum weed control properties reduce the need for tillage and for multiple applications of selective herbicides. This minimizes erosion of the top layer of soil and helps reduce costs associated with mechanical labor and fuel use. Glufosinate-ammonium helps preserve water and biodiversity on the farm.

Minimizing potential risks, and maximizing the productivity

We need to safeguard the diversity of species, ecosystems, and genetic diversity.

Glufosinate-ammonium does not lead to the loss of biodiversity if farmers use a balanced approach to pest management, which relies on a combination of various cultivation practices or the rotation of crops and the use of crop protection products. Reading the product label instructions and applying best agricultural practices help farmers preserve useful insects, pollinators and birds on their land. The use of specific application technologies – such as drift-reducing nozzles and spray shields – help further ensure responsible application of the product in the field.

Glufosinate-ammonium effectively controls weeds around the crops and helps farmers produce better and more abundant harvests. If farmers manage to improve yields per acre, maximizing productivity, there will be no need to convert precious land rich in biodiversity to agricultural fields.

Did you know?

  • Without herbicides net farm margins would fall by up to 40% due to the increased number of treatments, working time, labor costs and equipment, according to a recent French study.1
  • 80% of German growers expect strong or very strong negative economic impact if they lose the ability to use Glufosinate-ammonium. 50% of them have no other option to control suckers.
Hectares of farmland per capita
World farmland is limited and is difficult to expand further. In 1950, there was 0.52 hectares of farmland per capita, while in 2010, it shrank to 0.20 per capita.
1 | Synthesis: the impacts of Basta F1’s ban for three crop production systems in France?, Solucom, 2011.
“México es maíz” – y la resistencia a los herbicidas está creciendo

Samuel Sahagún ha cultivado por más de 30 años tierras cerca de Ocotlán, Jalisco. Samuel tiene una granja familiar que heredó de su padre y de su abuelo. En el año 2015, la resistencia de los herbicidas a las malas hierbas se convirtió en un problema. "Fue entonces cuando noté la reducción de la eficacia de los herbicidas convencionales que estaba usando y la necesidad de más cuidado en el control de las malas hierbas", explica. Samuel usa una combinación de diversos herbicidas que contienen diferentes ingredientes activos para abordar el problema de resistencia en su maíz y trigo de invierno. Gracias a la mayor conciencia sobre la resistencia a las malezas y al conocimiento cada vez mayor sobre cómo enfrentar el problema, Samuel Sahagun y sus compañeros agricultores confían en mantener el papel principal de Jalisco en la producción de maíz.

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Learn about LibertyLink Crops

What alternatives to using Glufosinate-ammonium does the farmer have?

Alternative chemical treatments often affect whole plants rather than just the part of the plant with which they come into contact, which would harm the crop. Alternative chemical treatments also tend to have a smaller spectrum of control.

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